15-15 | Teegarden-Centennial Covered Bridge/Teegarden
Teegarden, Ohio

Side A | Teegarden-Centennial Covered Bridge

The Teegarden-Centennial Covered Bridge, constructed primarily of white oak is of Multiple King Post design spanning 67 feet. It was built nearly 100 years after the birth of the nation. Located on Eagleton Road, just off Teegarden Road, it is still at its original location, spanning the Middle Fork of the Little Beaver Creek in Eagleton's Glen Park. It remained in use until 1992 when it was bypassed by a new concrete structure. The official contract for the construction of the bridge was awarded to Jeremiah C. Mountz in June of 1875. The stonework for the abutments was awarded to David Reese and painting of the original structure to George W. Akin in 1876. Members of Highland Christian Church came here to be baptized by immersion. There were over 250 covered bridges in Columbiana County, including at least 16 railroad covered bridges. The Teegarden-Centennial Covered Bridge is one of only five still remaining.

Sponsors: Teegarden-Centennial Covered Bridge Association, Columbiana County Engineer's Office, Columbiana County Commissioners, and The Ohio Historical Society

2003                                    

Side B | Teegarden

A small village called Teegarden, founded by Prussian immigrants and named after the William Teegarden family, grew up around this site in the early 1800s. Levi Blackledge settled in Teegarden and built a water-powered gristmill in 1804. Later, in 1805, he built a water-powered sawmill near the same site. The gristmill, which ground flour for many farmers in the area, was replaced in 1816 with a frame structure that stood until 1904. A post office was established in 1868 with Uriah Teegarden serving as the first postmaster. This area was also used for coal mining with deep mines of the B.F. Lewis Coal and Iron Company. Extensive deposits of kidney ore were also mined here and shipped on the Erie Railroad (currently the Greenway Bike Trail) to the Cherry Valley and Grafton Furnaces at Leetonia and the Rebecca Furnace at McKinley Crossing near Lisbon.

Notes

This marker sits on the outskirts of Salem in the small Prussian settled village of Teegarden- home to one of the many bike trails found in the area. The marker notes that at one time there were over 250 covered bridges in the county; this bridge, going across Little Beaver Creek, is one of the only five remaining, but what makes it truly impressive is that it was in use until only about 25 years ago. Check out the pre-renovation photo inside the bridge.

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